Why I Will Be Getting the COVID-19 Vaccine

Why I Will Be Getting the COVID-19 Vaccine
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On Nov. 9, Pfizer and BioNTech announced that their COVID-19 vaccine was found to be more than 90% effective in preventing people from contracting the novel coronavirus. On Nov. 16, Moderna announced their COVID-19 vaccine to have an efficacy of 94.5%. 

I had zero expectations for news of a potential vaccine. I had started to lose hope and had accepted that my current reality of reduced contact, shielding, and fear every time someone around me coughed or sneezed would be all I knew for a very long time.

I was extremely happy upon hearing the news. I suddenly thought about things becoming normal again, which was something I had looked forward to but was not expecting to happen. 

This news instantly lifted my spirits. I think of myself as a naturally positive person, but I guess constant exposure to bad news diminished my hope.

There is still a long way to go in terms of ensuring the vaccine’s safety and distributing it effectively. Regardless, I am so thankful to learn that medical advances are being made. I am becoming more hopeful.

When discussing this news with those close to me, I expected to hear more positive opinions. This was not the case. “I’m not getting a vaccine” is the response I have heard over and over again, and this took me by surprise.

This just reiterated how seriously people have to take this pandemic. Because I am extremely clinically vulnerable due to sickle cell diseaseI will get vaccinated as soon as a safe option becomes available. I have to do my part to protect myself, especially if those around me aren’t as concerned about catching the virus. 

Whenever a new medication or vaccination is developed, I understand that people may feel very apprehensive to use it for a range of different reasons. However, this virus and the threat it poses are very real, so I need to act with my best interests in mind.

I have to trust that scientists and researchers are doing their part to make it as safe as possible. They have guidelines and criteria they must fulfill, so I take comfort in that. I look forward to hearing more good news.

How did you feel when you heard about the COVID-19 vaccine? Do you intend to get vaccinated when one becomes available? Please share your thoughts in the comments below.

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Note: Sickle Cell Anemia News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Sickle Cell Anemia News or its parent company, BioNews, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to sickle cell anemia.

Tito is a 23-year-old London-based tenancy manager and lover of life. For as long as she can remember, she’s had a passion for helping others. She writes to help others realize that sickle cell doesn’t need to define their entire identity.
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Tito is a 23-year-old London-based tenancy manager and lover of life. For as long as she can remember, she’s had a passion for helping others. She writes to help others realize that sickle cell doesn’t need to define their entire identity.
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  • health, raising awareness, productive, lessons, pace, covid-19 vaccine, lockdown, overwhelmed, friend, hospital, happiness
  • health, raising awareness, productive, lessons, pace, covid-19 vaccine, lockdown, overwhelmed, friend, hospital, happiness
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4 comments

  1. Helen C Williams says:

    I have sickle beta + thalassemia and am a senior citizen, just turned 70 years old with multiple other health problems including heart failure. As I read about the vaccine and how they were developed using the RNA strand, I am finding less to be afraid of with regard to receiving one of them. I already take all the vaccines recommended for sickle patients (pneumonia, flu, meningitis, etc) and think I will take this vaccine when it becomes available. It’s bad enough to be fearful of the usual conditions, but to add the Corona virus takes everything to another level. Yes, my doctor and I will discuss this vaccine and when I can, I will take it. Thank you for your opinion and I agree with you, wholeheartedly!

  2. Robert says:

    You make a very good point. We trust the scientist but not the politics behind them pushing the rush of this vaccine. With that said you give me something to think about regarding my son who has SCD. Him being protected when half of the world is refusing to help would give me peace of mind.

  3. Michael Umoren says:

    Thank u so much for this website i really do appreciate it. I felt hopeless but this website has given me hope for the future.

  4. Lorrene says:

    Hello all the way from the USA. I’M a 64 year old with SS disease. I plan on getting the vaccine as soon as possible. Pray that there will be no side effects. Ii know it’s scary but I have learned is that it is not the live virus that is being I injected, so it should be safe.

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